CMMC – Close-up: In the Tide Pools

I recently posted photos of my visit to Salt Creek Beach in Dana Point, California. As promised, here are more detailed photos of my amazing finds in the tide pools, which I am sharing for Cee’s Midweek Madness Challenge (CMMC) – close-up or macro photos. While the effects of some humans (October’s oil spill–argh) are still seen in the tide pools now, I made sure to leave these little ones right where I found them.

This looked like an interesting turban shell, exposed during low tide at Salt Creek Beach in Dana Point, California.

Whoops! There’s still an animal inside the turban shell! After snapping a quick photo, I turned it back over.

Sea anemone in low tide at Salt Creek Beach in Dana Point, California; the tentacles are its actual color, but sadly, there is also oil on its body.

Clam taking a ride on back of snail in intertidal zone at Salt Creek Beach in Dana Point, California.

Remnants of October oil spill are present in intertidal zone at Salt Creek Beach in Dana Point, California.

To my delight, I found a couple little sea hares (adults are bigger than these, and probably in deeper waters). I have found others a little north at Crystal Cove; check them out here.

Sea hare feeding on red lettuce, near sea anemones at Salt Creek Beach tide pools in Dana Point, California.

A closer look at California sea hare in tide pool at Salt Creek Beach in Dana Point, California.

A clam and barnacle catch a ride on a snail in tide pool at Salt Creek Beach, Dana Point, California.

This next photo required me to stand carefully in calf-deep (and cold!) water on a sandbar, in between waves. I had to be very stealth, because there were some tourists nearby. I did not want to alert the presence of this sea star to them, as the tourists had sand pails and baggies for collection (a pet peeve of mine!). I have not seen a starfish in the southern California tide pools in years, so this was the highlight of my day.

One lone sea star in intertidal zone at Salt Creek Beach in Dana Point, California.

Sea stars like to eat mollusks, like this Kellet’s whelk (sea snail)–the two were found in the same tide pool area at Salt Creek Beach in Dana Point, California.

Published by Dawn Palmer

I am a professional proofreader (ProofreadingatDawn.com) and write a photography blog (PeacefulatDawn.com). In my free time, I love taking photos, admiring beautiful moments in nature, and I will often be out early in the morning or late in the evening trying to capture the peacefulness and beauty around me.

14 thoughts on “CMMC – Close-up: In the Tide Pools

    1. Amazingly clear and detailed pictures of these sea creatures..liked your narratives to understand the beauty and fragility of ocean life.

      Like

  1. Amazingly clear and detailed pictures of these sea creatures..liked your narratives to understand the beauty and fragility of ocean life.

    Liked by 1 person

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